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and before the great recession. ali dug deeper into the report with larry icall the project director for pew's philadelphia program. listen. >> one of the fascinating things we found was in 1970, 44% of people we considered middle class did not have a high school degree because there were the blue collar jobs available. that's not the case now. you need a college degree or a lot of college education to be considered part of the middle class. it's true nationally and in philadelphia. >> i've been talking to people about this all day. they say, "tell me why? why did it happen? what happened to philadelphia? why was it hit harder to other cities that you looked at?" what is the april to that. >> it was certainly hit hard. whether it was harder than other cities is hard to say. philadelphia was a heavily manufacturing town. when those jobs disappeared it tack a hard hit and maybe a little longer than other cities figure out what the next step is. now it's dependent on education and the medical sector and that is working better for the city. >> is the geography of philadelphia - does it work a
to dig deeper in this report is larry eikle the director of the pew's philadelphia program. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having yes. >> philadelphia is a beautiful place. i call it home. and it really was traditionally a proudly middle class place. people were really okay being middle class, and middle class in the 50's and 60's, and into the 70's in many classes could actually mean blue color. >> it absolutely could. one of the fascinating things we found was in 1970 44% of the people we considered middle class didn't even have a high school degree because there were those blue collar jobs available. that's not the case now. you need a college degree or a lot of college education to be part of the middle class. that's true nationally and it's certainly true in philadelphia. >> so when people say, i've been talking to people about this all day. tell me why philadelphia was hit harder than other cities that you've looked at, what is the answer to that? >> well, it was certainly hit hard. whether it was harder than other cities i think is hard to say, but philadelphia w
with larry the project director for pew's philadelphia program. listen. >> one of the fascinating things we found was that in 970, 44% of the people that we considered middle class didn't even have a high school degree. because there were those blue collar jobs available. obviously that's not the case now. you need a college degree or at least a lot of college education to be considered part of the middle class. and that's true nationally. it's certainly true in philadelphia. >> so when people say -- i have been talking to people about this all day. and they say, tell me why? why did it happen? what happened to philadelphia why was it hit harder than so many other cities that you looked at? what's the answer to that? >> well, i mean, it was certainly hit hard whether it was harder than other cities is hard to say think philadelphia was a heavily manufacturing town. and when those jobs disappeared, it took a hard hit, and it may be took a little longer than some other cities to figure out what the next step was. now, you know, it's a heavily dependent on education and the medical sector and
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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